News

City proposes plan for St. Johns River cleanup

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Cleanup will soon begin on the St. Johns River thanks to a plan proposed by the city. It comes two years after it was supposed to be released.

Earlier this month tests showed toxins were below the harmful level for recreational exposure but about the threshold for drinking water.

According to the Florida Times Union, it's still unclear how the city will fund the work.  There are construction projects that will cost at least $300 million dollars.

Public Works Director Jim Robinson wrote a letter to the Florida Department of Environmental Protection in September. He said the city is committed to making improvements to the health of the St. Johns river and its tributaries and will meet state-imposed water pollution reduction goals for 2015 and 2023.

On Your Side: Checking an Officer's identification

CLAY COUNTY, Fla. -- First Coast News got an email from Joyce who said someone disguised as a police officer came to her door, demanding $6,000. She was afraid and eventually gave it to the man.

Captain Joe Bucci, with the Clay County Sheriff's Office, gave tangible information on how you can confirm whether or not someone that comes to your door is an Official Law Enforcement Officer.

According to Bucci:

1) Ask to see a badge and department identification. It'll have a photo with it.

2) Call the dispatch center when the person gives you a badge number to confirm who they are.

3) Ask for a supervisor with dispatch to triple check.

4) When in doubt, if you're not sure, take their information and confirm it inside your home while they wait outside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Valve Replacement Therapy Offers Alternative to Open Heart Surgery

JACKSONVILLE, FLA - A revolutionary new heart treatment is offering new hope to patients considered ineligible for open heart surgery or at great risk of suffering serious surgical complications.

Known as Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR), the minimally invasive procedure is now being used to treat patients suffering from severe aortic valve stenosis. One of the most common valve disease disorders, aortic stenosis typically results from aging, as calcium or scarring narrows and hardens the heart’s aortic valve. As blood flow through the valve becomes constricted, individuals may experience chest pain, shortness of breath, fainting and palpitations. For those with severe aortic stenosis, the condition can lead to congestive heart failure and even death.

Residents will have to bear the heat a little longer

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- The dog days of summer have turned Mount Carmel Gardens into a hotbed of complaints.

"It is getting bad," said Paul Makowski.

The tenants of the high rise are mostly seniors and the disabled. John Duggan said he finds it much cooler outside in the shade than inside his apartment.

"They say they're working on it," said Duggan, "But a lot of people have doubts."

The complex is privately owned but receives HUD rental subsidy.

"You call and yeah its going to get fixed, when is anybody doing anything?" asked Donna Clabough.

It is a question everyone is asking. Kenny Dockswell uses a fan in his apartment but said he's paying for air conditioning service, not a fan.

Rayne Perrywinkle tries to regain custody of daughters

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Rayne Perrywinkle sat nervously in a Duval County courtroom waiting; she's trying to regain custody of her two daughters, ages six and four.

Perrywinkle, 45, dressed in black, remained stoic as the judge asked questions about the welfare of the children.

"Are the children set for school?" asked Judge Gooding. 

At one point, the judge expressed condolences, but there was no reunification. Instead, Perrywinkle was ordered to drug court under heavy security for screening.

"We'll see what that reveals," said the judge.

The screen was ordered after an attorney told the court that it has been reported that Perrywinkle had used prescription medication that was not hers.

Attorney Patty Parker was at the hearing. Parker represents the children.

Concerns raised after San Marco flooding

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- Flooding frustration. Some people in the San Marco Square area say it's a fact of life. Others say it's a concern, especially when you get pictures of flooding during a multimillion dollar renovation project.

"The streets were up to your ankles in certain places a little higher," said Mariah Back, who works in the square.

"Where the roads dip in," Tristen Cash, who also works in the square, said. "It was just standing water. It was just flooded."

At the Pizza Palace in San Marco Square is where you'll find freshly made pies and employee Cash. As the rain fell Sunday, she grew concerned.

"How am I going to get home?" she said Monday, with a laugh.

The pizza shop sits near the heart of the square and the $5 million construction project.

Your guide to First Coast 4th of July celebrations

Firework displays and events scheduled to celebrate the 4th of July holiday across the First Coast. Here's a list of the festivities:

Columbia County celebrates 4th of July

Clay County celebrates the 4th of July

Fernandina Beach celebrates 4th of July

Flagler County celebrates 4th of July